LIVISTONA ROTUNDIFOLIA PDF

Hermaphroditic palm. Trunk to 45 m tall, cm in diam. Flowers solitary or in clusters of , to mm long, yellowish, sessile on small pulvini; sepals broadly ovate, very obtuse, dorsally carinate; petals less obtuse, yellowish; ovary glabrous; style subulate, acute, very short. Fruit globose to subglobose, mm in diam. Seed globose, mm in diam. Eophyll 5 ribbed.

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Hermaphroditic palm. Trunk to 45 m tall, cm in diam. Flowers solitary or in clusters of , to mm long, yellowish, sessile on small pulvini; sepals broadly ovate, very obtuse, dorsally carinate; petals less obtuse, yellowish; ovary glabrous; style subulate, acute, very short. Fruit globose to subglobose, mm in diam. Seed globose, mm in diam. Eophyll 5 ribbed. Editing by edric. Livistona rotundifolia is treated here as a variable species.

Previous taxonomy, which included a number of taxa that are herein synonymised, is otherwise difficult to support. The morphological diversity within L. These variable characters appear to occur more or less randomly throughout the entire population. Livistona rotundifolia was the first species in the genus to be taxonomically recognised, and named by Rumphius in the pre-Linnean publication Herbarium Amboinense, as the mononomial Saribus.

Linnaeus included Rumphius' Saribus as part of his broadly circumscribed Corypha umbraculifera. Merrill , p. Moore a proposed S. The entity of Saribus Rumph. To clarify the identity of the species, Blume established the genus Saribus, utilising the name of Rumphius' mononomial as his genus name, to include C. Soon after, Martius provided the first synopsis of Livistona, subsuming Blume's Saribus and some Corypha species by various authors, resulting in the currently accepted combination Livistona rotundifolia.

Martius' account clearly established the relationship of L. In the latter two references, Loureiro's C. Martius, however, excluded C. See Notes under L. Livistona altissima was described by Zollinger for palms cultivated at Bogor Botanic Gardens Miquel, with a "trunco altissimo gracili" but otherwise resembled L. Livistona altissima was first synonymised under L.

Livistona robinsoniana was described by Beccari based on Robinson from Polillo Is Robinson, , and named for the collector, Canadian botanist, C. Robinson Beccari related L. However, fruit colour in L. Beccari a, b ultimately recognised three subspecies of L. The characters that Beccari used to delimit the Philippine subspecies were narrow and can be accounted for in the overall variation that would be expected to occur in a widespread species. Beccari , p. Regarding fruit colour in L.

Some of the original designations of fruit colour for L. Livistona rotundifolia is one of a distinct group of closely related species that has its distribution in Malesia, including the Philippines. The group is characterised by a trifurcate, or very infrequently bifurcate inflorescence, and fruit maturing through an orange-red phase to be fully mature at orange, red, crimson, dark red or black.

The group consists of L. Dowe, J. Saribus rotundifolia requires a shady, sheltered position when young but is quite happy in full sun when more mature and the humidity is very high.

Although the Footstool Palm is from the tropics it has successfully been grown in sub-tropical and even warm temperate areas. Cold Hardiness Zone: 10a. In September , after DNA research the reclassification from the genus Livistona to the resurrected genus Saribus was official. Etymology: Saribus; Latin, from the Maluku vernacular name, sariboe. This palm was classified as Livistona rotundifolia prior to This palm is native to SE Asia where it is one of the more common landscape plants.

It is not so common in the U. Under ideal growing conditions warmth and humidity it is one of the fastest growing palms in the world. There are reports of growth rates from seedling to foot trunk in 3 years! It can ultimately reach heights of 80 feet or more. Young plants prefer some shade but mature ones love full sun. It is a tall palm with a solitary stem, growing to about 18—27 m tall.

Foliage: Its long-stalked, spirally arranged palmate leaves have leaf blades that are almost round in outline, and regularly divided to about half of the length, 1. Flowers: Its flowers are borne on a long-stalked inflorescence, about 0. Fruits: Its round fruits are fleshy drupes that are about 2 cm across, ripening from red to black. Its flowers are pollinated by bees.

Its fruits are eaten by frugivorous birds. Saribus rotundifolius syn: Livistona rotundifolia is a very attractive palm, especially when young, due to its large, round, shiny, shallowly divided leaves. Trunk: Solitary, smooth, brown, with the rings of the scars of the foliar petioles in evidence and clothed with beautifully greyish woven fibres in the upper part below the crown. In its natural habitat it can grow to up to 24 metres in height but in a garden situation usually it will not grow that tall.

Diameter cm. Leaves: Broad, erect to pendent, palmate, wider than long, almost round in outline from a very early age, shiny, glossy green and incised for about half of their length in usually rigid and stiff segments. As it gets older however, the leaves become more divided, and not quite so pretty. The leaves in juvenile palms are about 1,5 metres wide and circular, while they are smaller, costapalmate in older palms and do not form a full circle. Petioles up to 2 metres, spiny at the base on lower surface in the young plants, almost unarmed in the adult specimen and blades are shorter than the petiole.

Inflorescences: About 2 metres long, dividing into 3 main axis bearing up to 4 orders of branching, with small, yellow, bisexual flowers. Blooming period: Spring to summer. The flowers appear in bunches only when the plant is very old. The plants that are used as potted plants do not generally flower. Fruits: Small spherical to 1, cm in diameter red to black when ripe. Saribus rotundifolius Lam.

Blume Arecaceae. A common urban landscaping palm species in Malaysia. Solitary trunk up to about cm of diameter; about 20 m tall. Photo by Dr. Kebun Raya Bogor, Java, Indonesia.

William J. Photo by Geoff Stein. Leu Gardens, Florida. May 22, February 16, Putrajaya Botanical Gardens, Putrajaya, Malaysia. Taman Botani Putrajaya. Photo by Ahmad Fuad Morad. These trees are in in a lot between the School of Music and the Film Center and in front of the University carillon tower, University of the Philippines. Ernesto P. It turns out that S.

Rotundifolia is the National Leaf of the Philippines. Special thanks to Palmweb. John Dransfield, Dr. Uhl, C. Asmussen-Lange, W.

Baker, M. Genera Palmarum - Evolution and Classification of the Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. All images copyright of the artists and photographers see images for credits. A taxonomic account of Livistona R. Many Special Thanks to Ed Vaile for his long hours of tireless editing and numerous contributions.

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Livistona rotundifolia

Table palm is a very attractive plant, especially when young, due to its large, round, shiny, shallowly divided leaves. It can adapt itself better than many other plants to the indoor conditions of our homes and buildings. It can also tolerate some amount of neglect. The leaves of the plant look like a fan and hence the name fan palm. Common name: Table palm, Footstool palm, Fan palm Botanical Name: Livistona rotundifolia Family: Palmae Foliage: The leaves are round in outline from a very early age and have a glossy green colour.

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Footstool Palm

Plants are supplied in standard nursery pots. A gorgeous little gem of an indoor palm tree, with glossy palmate leaves. The product might return to stock, however there is no scheduled date. If you need more informationregarding availability date or stocks, please get in touch with us. Feed with a mild fertiliser once in fortnight during spring and summer. Do not fertilise in winter. We can guarantee that the plants leave our nursery disease free, but weather and local conditions might affect their survival.

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