BS 7273-4 PDF

Latest version of document. Offers recommendations for design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of electrical control arrangements for actuation of mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire. Looks at categories and methods of actuation. Supersedes BS First published April Second present edition, June

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It replaces the version, which is superseded, and although the version is heading towards three years old, it is all too easy to forget which parts were updated. So for those of you who need a refresh, read on…. BS in a nutshell is about the operation and release of electronically controlled fire doors.

It recommends how to actuate mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire in all buildings including dwellings except where stated.

It provides recommendations for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of electrical control arrangements for actuation of mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire. It applies to all aspects of the interface between these mechanisms and a fire detection and fire alarm system, including interfaces that incorporate acoustic coupling and radio transmission. It also enhances some of the recommendations of BS with regard to detector siting and spacing in certain categories of system.

Why might electronically controlled doors be used anyway? There are a number of instances where electronic door release mechanisms might be used, and for those that are already in the security world, these may be obvious and apparent since security itself is one of the main reasons it might be considered.

For security reasons, it may be necessary to keep a particular door shut — but it may be impractical to keep it locked with lock and key, since if the door is also being used as a fire exit, people will need to use it to escape. In this case controlled-access doors with an electronic door mechanism may be installed if there is a need to release the door in case of fire, for example if the door leads to staff areas.

The second reason why a door release mechanism may be used is down to accessibility. In some situations, for the sake of accessibility, there may be a need to keep doors in corridors open. However, as we all should be aware, an open door invites fire to spread much more rapidly through the building. Here a door mechanism may be employed to close the doors to prevent the spread of fire.

The final reason for installing a door release mechanism is simple: convenience. In some situations, such as doors to shops, it may make more sense to install automatic doors that will open in the event of fire to ensure safe exit of all staff, customers, and site visitors. From these three examples, it is easy to see how different doors for different buildings can be used in different ways, and also in some circumstances there are different needs too — and that all depends on whether the door needs to open or shut in the event of fire.

As such, the problem with the application of BS is that it can be a very demanding standard that can be difficult to meet due to the different needs and requirements of different doors throughout the building. Which doors should be released? How do you make the fire alarm system communicate with the door release mechanism? This can sometimes be made all the more complicated in bigger buildings with multiple storeys and a wide variety of doors.

In addition, different buildings have different needs and each case needs to be treated individually. What might work for one building might not work for another, even if there are many similarities as we have already discussed above. There is also a conflict between two standards: what BS says may confuse your interpretation of BS So if the design of the building calls for a category L1, L2, or L3 design, stick with BS and the guidance within.

Otherwise for category L4 or L5 systems, design the system with BS in mind. Is it going to unlock or just open? How will you get the door to fulfil its role as a fire door? Door release mechanisms are typically one of three things. They could be electromagnetic door holders that release self-closing doors in an emergency; or electromagnetic locks that prevent unauthorised access but will still release in an emergency; or powered sliding doors that open in an emergency.

Take these into consideration when thinking about fire doors and their purposes. By identifying the category of door system, you can base your design for the alarm system on these factors. Where and how you can use these different categories of door system depends a lot on the building and the environment you are working within. There is also a range of handy reference charts and diagrams to refer to so that you can find out how to space the detectors in relation to the doors.

At the time of writing another technical document on the subject is also being produced. As with all our technical documents, they are created by technical experts and FIA members who sit on a range of FIA councils. These groups work to ensure that the information presented is the most accurate and up-to-date information available. All technical documents mentioned in this article are free to download.

Covering 17 different subjects at 16 venues around the UK. The FIA is involved with a broad range of organisations which have an impact on the fire protection industry, however small. BS Explained. So for those of you who need a refresh, read on… BS in a nutshell is about the operation and release of electronically controlled fire doors. Uses for door release mechanisms Why might electronically controlled doors be used anyway? The problems with BS As such, the problem with the application of BS is that it can be a very demanding standard that can be difficult to meet due to the different needs and requirements of different doors throughout the building.

Advice for working with BS Tip 1: Identify the type of door mechanism. Tip 2: Identify the categories of the door systems. TAGS Standards British standard fire doors fire and security fire alarms integrated fire and security fire escape. Return to listing. Related posts. Update to The Building Regulations 27 May OK Cancel.

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BS 7273: operation of fire protection measures

DRM is included at the request of the publisher, as it helps them protect their copyright by restricting file sharing. Visit FileOpen to see the full list. June Code of practice for the operation of fire protection measures. Actuation of release mechanisms for doors.

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BS 7273-4:2015

BS Code of practice for the operation of fire protection measures — part 4: Actuation of release mechanisms for doors was published on 30 June It replaces the version, which is superseded, and although the version is heading towards three years old, it is all too easy to forget which parts were updated. So, for those of you who need a refresh, read on…. BS in a nutshell is about the operation and release of fire doors. It recommends how to actuate mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire in all buildings including dwellings except where stated. It provides recommendations for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of electrical control arrangements for actuation of mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of fire.

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BSI Revises BS 7273-4:2015 Code Of Practice For Fire Protection

BSI, the business standards company has revised BS Code of Practice for the operation of fire protection measures — Part 4: Actuation of release mechanisms for doors. Fire doors are typically designed to be kept closed at all times so that fire and heat are contained and their spread minimized. This is achieved through use of well-engineered fire doors. This standard relates to the engineering of fire alarm systems and in particular mechanisms to interface with fire doors and secured fire exits. It addresses safety critical arrangements that enforcing authorities rely on to ensure a building can be evacuated safely — where fire doors are held open or exits secured which need to be released by the fire alarm system. It is vital that there is a common approach to fire alarm design with regard to these interfaces.

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