PROE FAMILY TABLE TUTORIAL PDF

Suppose you want to design a group of similar products that vary only slightly from each other. For example, think of a collection of socket wrenches ranging from 0. Rather than model and save each piece separately, you can create a generic socket in PTC Creo , and then use a Family Table to quickly create variants of the generic by changing just the relevant dimensions or parameters. With table-driven design, every row in your table produces a different variant of the generic.

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Family Tables are collections of parts or assemblies or features that are essentially similar, but deviate slightly in one or two aspects, such as size or detail features. For example, wood screws come in various sizes, but they all look alike and perform the same function.

Thus, it is useful to think of them as a family of parts. Parts in Family Tables are also known as table-driven parts. The following figure shows a family of bolts. The generic is at the top of the figure, and its instances are underneath.

The generic is the parent. Family Tables promote the use of standardized components. They let you represent your actual part inventory in Creo Parametric. Moreover, families make it easy to interchange parts and subassemblies in an assembly, because instances from the same family are automatically interchangeable with each other.

Family Tables are essentially spreadsheets, consisting of columns and rows. They consist of the following three components:. The base object generic object or generic on which all members of the family are based. Dimensions and parameters, feature numbers, user-defined feature names, and assembly member names that are selected to be table-driven hereafter referred to as items.

Names of all family members instances created by the table and the corresponding values for each of the table-driven items. Rows contain instances of parts and their corresponding values; columns are used for items. The column headings include the instance name, and the names of all of the dimensions, parameters, features, members, and groups that were selected for the table.

Dimensions are listed by name for example, d9 with the associated symbol name if any on the line below it for example, depth.

Parameters are listed by name dim symbol. Features are listed by feature number for example F with the associated feature type for example [ cut ] or feature name on the line below it. The generic model is in the first row in the table. The table entries belonging to the generic can be changed only by modifying the actual part, suppressing, or resuming features; you cannot change the generic model by editing its entries in the Family Tables. Family Table names are not case-sensitive.

Therefore, any subsequent references to inserted names show them in uppercase letters. For each instance, you can define whether a feature, parameter, or assembly name is used in the instance either by indicating whether it is present in the instance Y or N or by providing a numeric value in the case of a dimension.

All aspects of the generic model that are not included in the Family Table automatically occur in each instance. For example, if the generic model has a parameter called Material with a value Steel , all instances will have the same parameter and value.

You can scroll horizontally through a Family Table to see additional information. The Instance Name column remains visible as you scroll.

Family Table functionality varies with your Creo Parametric module licenses. Available Family Table Functionality. Basic Creo Parametric. Create table-driven parts by adding dimensions to the Family Table. Create table-driven assemblies by adding to the Family Table subassembly and part names, as well as assembly dimensions. Create table-driven user-defined groups whose group feature dimensions can be table-driven, invariable, or variable.

Add table-driven groups to a part Family Table.

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Free CAD Tutorials: Free Pro Engineer Tutorial: How to create and use family tables in pro engineer

Family Tables are collections of parts or assemblies or features that are essentially similar, but deviate slightly in one or two aspects, such as size or detail features. For example, wood screws come in various sizes, but they all look alike and perform the same function. Thus, it is useful to think of them as a family of parts. Parts in Family Tables are also known as table-driven parts. The following figure shows a family of bolts.

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Guide to Family Tables in Creo

Creating family table is most effective when you need to create huge numbers of similar parts. For example, you have to create a database of different sizes of bolts. By using family table, the parts can be standardize. Another benefit of family table is in making of parts catalog; Family table file can be included easily in parts catalog.

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