ELAINE SHOWALTER TOWARD A FEMINIST POETICS PDF

Jacobus, ed. Women Writing about Women , pp. To begin to trace out this radically female-centered theory, Showalter notes excerpts from feminist historians and sociologists. Finally, Showalter posits the third and at least in final phase, the Female phase, which began in It is intelligent, largely devoid of rhetorical extremities, and confidently provocative. She is both urgent, in that she sees change needing to occur immediately, and patient, in that she expects that, given time enough, the wisdom and truth of her cause will prevail.

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Elaine Showalter born January 21, [1] is an American literary critic , feminist , and writer on cultural and social issues. She is one of the founders of feminist literary criticism in United States academia , developing the concept and practice of gynocritics , a term describing the study of "women as writers".

Best known in academic and popular cultural fields, [2] she has written and edited numerous books and articles focused on a variety of subjects, from feminist literary criticism to fashion, sometimes sparking widespread controversy, especially with her work on illnesses. Showalter has been a television critic for People magazine and a commentator on BBC radio and television. Born Elaine Cottler in Boston , Massachusetts, Showalter pursued an academic career against the wishes of her parents. Her first academic appointment was at Douglass College at Rutgers University.

She joined Princeton University 's faculty in , and took early retirement in Her father was in the wool business and her mother was a housewife. At age 21, Showalter was disowned by her parents for marrying outside the Jewish faith.

The Showalters have two children, Michael Showalter , an actor and comedian, and Vinca Showalter LaFleur , a professional speechwriter. Her most innovative work in this field is in madness and hysteria in literature, specifically in women's writing and in the portrayal of female characters.

She is the Avalon Foundation Professor Emerita. Her academic honors include a [Guggenheim Fellowship] and a Rockefeller Humanities fellowship — In Showalter was chair of the judges for the prestigious British literary award, the Man Booker International Prize. Showalter's book Inventing Herself , a survey of feminist icons, was the culmination of a lengthy interest in communicating the importance of understanding feminist tradition. Showalter's early essays and editorial work in the late s and the s survey the history of the feminist tradition within the "wilderness" of literary theory and criticism.

Working in the field of feminist literary theory and criticism, which was just emerging as a serious scholarly pursuit in universities in the s, Showalter's writing reflects a conscious effort to convey the importance of mapping her discipline's past in order to both ground it in substantive theory, and amass a knowledge base that will be able to inform a path for future feminist academic pursuit. In Towards a Feminist Poetics Showalter traces the history of women's literature, suggesting that it can be divided into three phases:.

Rejecting both imitation and protest, Showalter advocated approaching feminist criticism from a cultural perspective in the current Female phase, rather than from perspectives that traditionally come from an androcentric perspective like psychoanalytic and biological theories, for example. Feminists in the past have worked within these traditions by revising and criticizing female representations, or lack thereof, in the male traditions that is, in the Feminine and Feminist phases.

In her essay Feminist Criticism in the Wilderness , Showalter says, "A cultural theory acknowledges that there are important differences between women as writers: class, race, nationality, and history are literary determinants as significant as gender. Nonetheless, women's culture forms a collective experience within the cultural whole, an experience that binds women writers to each other over time and space" New , Showalter does not advocate replacing psychoanalysis , for example, with cultural anthropology ; rather, she suggests that approaching women's writing from a cultural perspective is one among many valid perspectives that will uncover female traditions.

However, cultural anthropology and social history are especially fruitful because they "can perhaps offer us a terminology and a diagram of women's cultural situation" New , Showalter's caveat is that feminist critics must use cultural analyses as ways to understand what women write, rather than to dictate what they ought to write New , However isolationist-like Showalter's perspective may sound at first, she does not advocate a separation of the female tradition from the male tradition.

She argues that women must work both inside and outside the male tradition simultaneously New , Showalter says the most constructive approach to future feminist theory and criticism lies in a focus on nurturing a new feminine cultural perspective within a feminist tradition that at the same time exists within the male tradition, but on which it is not dependent and to which it is not answerable.

Showalter coined the term "gynocritics" to describe literary criticism based in on a female perspective. Probably the best description Showalter gives of gynocritics is in Towards a Feminist Poetics :. This does not mean that the goal of gynocritics is to erase the differences between male and female writing; gynocritics is not "on a pilgrimage to the promised land in which gender would lose its power, in which all texts would be sexless and equal, like angels" New , Rather gynocritics aims to understand women's writing not as a product of sexism but as a fundamental aspect of female reality.

Showalter acknowledges the difficulty of "[d]efining the unique difference of women's writing" which she says is "a slippery and demanding task" in "Feminist Criticism in the Wilderness" New , She says that gynocritics may never succeed in understanding the special differences of women's writing, or realize a distinct female literary tradition. But, with grounding in theory and historical research, Showalter sees gynocriticism as a way to "learn something solid, enduring, and real about the relation of women to literary culture" New , She stresses heavily the need to free "ourselves from the lineal absolute of male literary history".

That is going to be the point where gynocritics make a beginning. Moi particularly criticized Showalter's ideas regarding the Female phase, and its notions of a woman's singular autonomy and necessary search inward for a female identity. In a predominantly poststructuralist era that proposes that meaning is contextual and historical, and that identity is socially and linguistically constructed, Moi claimed that there is no fundamental female self.

According to Moi, the problem of equality in literary theory does not lie in the fact that the literary canon is fundamentally male and unrepresentative of female tradition, rather the problem lies in the fact that a canon exists at all. Moi argues that a feminine literary canon would be no less oppressive than the male canon because it would necessarily represent a particular socio demographic class of woman; it could not possibly represent all women because female tradition is drastically different depending on class, ethnicity, social values, sexuality, etc.

A female consciousness cannot exist for the same reasons. Moi objects to what she sees as an essentialist position — that is, she objects to any determination of identity based on gender.

Moi's criticism was influential as part of a larger debate between essentialist and postmodern feminist theorists at the time. Showalter's controversial take on illnesses such as dissociative identity disorder formerly called multiple personality disorder , Gulf War syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome in her book Hystories: Hysterical Epidemics and Modern Media has angered some in the health profession and many who suffer from these illnesses.

Writing in the New York Times , psychologist Carol Tavris commented that "In the absence of medical certainty, the belief that all such symptoms are psychological in origin is no improvement over the belief that none of them are. Showalter also came up against criticism in the late s for some of her writing on popular culture that appeared in magazines like People and Vogue.

Deirdre English , in the American magazine The Nation , wrote:. From Mary Wollstonecraft to Naomi Wolf , feminism has often taken a hard line on fashion, shopping, and the whole beauty Monty But for those of us sisters hiding Welcome to Your Facelift inside The Second Sex , a passion for fashion can sometimes seem a shameful secret life I think it's time I came out of the closet.

Showalter was reportedly severely criticized by her academic colleagues for her stance in favour of patriarchal symbols of consumer capitalism and traditional femininity. Showalter's rejoinder was: "We needn't fall into postmodern apocalyptic despair about the futility of political action or the impossibility of theoretical correctness as a pre-condition for action" English.

Teaching Literature was widely and positively reviewed, especially in the American journal Pedagogy , which gave it three review-essays and called it "the book we wish we had in our backpacks when we started teaching. Showalter's Ph. The Female Malady: Women, Madness, and English Culture, — discusses hysteria, which was once known as the "female malady" and according to Showalter, is called depression today. Showalter demonstrates how cultural ideas about proper feminine behaviour have shaped the definition and treatment of female insanity from the Victorian era to the present.

Sexual Anarchy: Gender at Culture at the Fin de Siecle outlines a history of the sexes and the crises, themes, and problems associated with the battle for sexual supremacy and identity.

In the s, Showalter began writing for popular magazines, bringing her work further into the public sphere than it ever had been during her academic career. Showalter was the television critic for People magazine in She explains her impetus to do popular cultural work: "I've always really loved popular culture, but it wasn't something serious intellectuals were supposed to be concerned about. In Hystories: Hysterical Epidemics and Modern Media Showalter argues that hysteria, a medical condition traditionally seen as feminine, has persisted for centuries and is now manifesting itself in cultural phenomena in the forms of socially and medically accepted maladies.

Psychological and physical effects of unhappy lives become "hysterical epidemics" when popular media saturate the public with paranoid reports and findings, essentially legitimizing, as Showalter calls them, "imaginary illnesses" Hystories , cover. Showalter says "Hysteria is part of everyday life. It not only survives in the s, but it is more contagious than in the past. Newspapers, magazines, talk shows, self-help books, and of course the Internet ensure that ideas, once planted, manifest themselves internationally as symptoms" Plett.

This view has caused Showalter to be criticized by patient's rights groups and medical practitioners, who argue that Showalter, with no formal medical training, is not qualified to make this determination.

Showalter covers the contributions of predominately intellectuals like Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Camille Paglia. Noting popular media's importance to the perception of women and feminism today, Showalter also discusses the contributions of popular personalities like Oprah Winfrey and Princess Diana.

Teaching Literature is essentially a guide to teaching English literature to undergraduate students in university. Showalter covers approaches to teaching theory, preparing syllabi and talking about taboo subjects among many other practical topics. Showalter says that teaching should be taken as seriously and given as much intellectual consideration as scholarship.

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Elaine Showalter

Showalter, Elaine. Elaine Showalter. London: Virago, Showalter wonders if such stereotypes emerge from the fact that feminism lacks a fully articulated theory. Another problem for Showalter is the way in which feminists turn away from theory as a result of the attitudes of some male academics: theory is their property.

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Elaine Showalter: ‘Towards a Feminist Poetics’

Elaine Showalter born January 21, [1] is an American literary critic , feminist , and writer on cultural and social issues. She is one of the founders of feminist literary criticism in United States academia , developing the concept and practice of gynocritics , a term describing the study of "women as writers". Best known in academic and popular cultural fields, [2] she has written and edited numerous books and articles focused on a variety of subjects, from feminist literary criticism to fashion, sometimes sparking widespread controversy, especially with her work on illnesses. Showalter has been a television critic for People magazine and a commentator on BBC radio and television. Born Elaine Cottler in Boston , Massachusetts, Showalter pursued an academic career against the wishes of her parents.

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Toward a Feminist Poetics. Elaine Showalter. In , Leon Edel, the distinguished biographer of Henry James, contributed to a London symposium of essays by six male critics called Contemporary Approaches to English Studies. Professor Edel presented his essay as a dramatized discussion between three literary scholars who stand arguing about art on the steps of the British Museum :. There was Criticus, a short , thick-bodied intellectual with spectacles, who clung to a pipe in his right hand.

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Post a comment. About the author: Elaine Showalter born January 21, is an American literary critic, feminist, and writer on cultural and social issues. She is one of the founders of feminist literary criticism in United States academia, developing the concept and practice of gynocritics. She is well known and respected in both academic and popular cultural fields.

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